Lumifi – a new tool for collaborative research

October 15, 2008

Lumifi is a new free tool for students, academia, professionals and enterprises.

Lumifi integrates different stages of research:

  • searching on the Web
  • content analyzing of websites and papers (documents)
  • typing notes
  • creating a list of notebooks that may be used as parts of your research
  • creating your research.

Lumifi interface needs some time to understand it as Lumifi lack HELP. There is only small FAQ.

Lumifi benefits as it is  is using Synapse content analyzer that enables evaluate search result and provide a small list of relevant search results, generate a summary of website or document and provide a list of topics related to the document.

Synapse content analyzer is a product of two engines – data mining engine and semantic analysis engine.

You will find and more benefits after getting more experience when using Lumifi.l

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40 Sites You Might Actually Use

June 26, 2008

There is anumber of web sites lists you should use.

Steve Spalding proposes one more list that includes sites of such categories:

  • News and bookmarking (Twine and other)
  • Conversation (Twitter and other)
  • Multimedia (Voxant and other)
  • Productivity ( I Want Sandy and other)
  • Blogging (Sitemeter and other)
  • Feeds (Google reader and other)
  • General interest (TextOnPhone and other)

Author writes that he use any of them at least one a month.


100 Helpful Web Tools for Every Kind of Learner

June 21, 2008

You can find an interesting  list of 100 tools.

Categories of tools:

  • Visual Learners

    Visual learners learn through seeing and retain more information when it’s presented in the form of pictures, diagrams, visual presentations, textbooks, handouts and videos. Here are some Web resources that cater to those needs.

    Mind Mapping

    Get your ideas charted out in a visual format with these easy-to-use online brainstorming and organizational tools.

  • Charting and Diagrams

    Love to put information into charts and diagrams? These tools can help you do that.

  • Videos and Photos

    Find everything you’ll need to learn through videos and pictures with these tools.

  • Auditory Learners

    Auditory learners do best in classes where listening is a main concern. These learners prefer verbal lectures and discussions. Auditory learners can get a leg up on their learning with these Web tools

  • Podcasts

    Get all kind of supplementary education materials through these great podcast tools.

  • Presentation Tools

    Put your notes or classroom information into an audio format with these handy apps.

  • Audio Tools

    Listen and edit your sounds and music with these tools.

  • Text Readers

    Understand material better when it’s read out loud? These Web tools can do that for you.

  • Audio Books

    Those who have trouble retaining information from printed words can listen to their assigned reading instead with help from these sites.

  • Kinesthetic Learners

    Kinesthetic learners do best when they interact and touch things. They prefer a hands-on approach to learning and enjoy interacting with classroom materials and those around them. These tools can help keep these inquisitive learners busy.

  • Note Taking Tools

    No matter what you’re reading or watching you can make it more interactive by taking notes and these tools can help.

  • Bookmarking

    Mark references for later while you’re researching with these tools.

  • Interaction

    Get involved with the material with these online applications.

  • Collaboration

    These chatting and networking tools can make it easy to interact with classmates and friends

You can find and other lists of tools if you click buttons on the left or right of the title.


Blog as a Web research tool

April 29, 2008
WWW's Image via Wikipedia

My colleague Andraž Tori in Twine has nicely proposed to try product Zemanta.

I have downloaded www.zemanta.com and test how it helps me to create a new post.

It’s the first post for testing.

At the right is the suggested image from the Gallery

Below is an extract from the suggested article

http://www.blogherald.com/2008/03/27/zemanta-for-bloggers-good-idea-bad-idea-or-great-idea/

Previously reviewed by TechCrunch, Zemanta offers itself as a useful tool to help make blogger’s post “more vibrant.”

Currently available only in Firefox and Internet Exploer (the latter still in beta testing), Zemanta’s main goal is to provide to help bloggers find relevant links to their articles by suggesting related content through words and images on the side (after you install it).

One of the great things about Zemanta is that it actually scans the web for Creative Commons content, so bloggers will be able to post useful images without the fear of being sued by an angry photographer/artist (provided they link back that is).

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10 Free Applications Every Student Needs

February 26, 2008

http://www.lifehack.org/articles/productivity/the-ultimate-student-resource-list.htm

Unless you have money coming out of your ears, you probably won’t want to shell out the cash you’ll need to get Office, Photoshop, Dreamweaver, EndNote, and so on — even with your student discount. These free apps do the job well enough, and sometimes even better than their paid or otherwise limited alternatives.

  • OpenOffice.org: A top-quality, full-featured office productivity suite — word processor, spreadsheet, presentation software, graphics editor, database, the works! Can save and open most Microsoft Office formats. If you have MS Works on your PC, ditch it and get OpenOffice.org instead. Available for most operating systems.
  • GIMP: A powerful, full-featured photo editing program, comparable to Photoshop. Available for Linux, Mac, and Windows.
  • KeyNote: Even after 2 1/2 years of being abandoned by its developer, KeyNote (not the Mac presentation software) remains the best free outlining software, with support for rich text formatting, plugins and macros, hotkeys, and a lot more. Can be run from a flash drive, too.
  • FreeMind: Great mindmapping program, useful for brainstorming, outlining projects, and keeping notes.
  • Mozy Backup: An Internet-based backup system, Mozy’s free plan allows you to store up to 2GB of files. The software runs in your system tray and automatically backs up the folders and files you’ve selected. I have it set to backup my documents folder and my email, which comes in just under 2GB. To backup photos, music, and other big files, you’ll need to upgrade to a paid version.
  • Zotero: A bibliography manager that integrates with Firefox, allowing you to automatically add webpages and, more usefully, resources from academic databases like J-Stor and AnthroSource to your bibliography. You can attach PDFs and images to your entries, as well as add your own notes. And all without leaving Firefox.
  • NVU: Mozilla’s web editor, NVU allows you to write webpages either in raw code or using the WYSIWYG interface, making webpage creation simple. UPDATE: NVU is no longer in development; the current version is called Kompozer.
  • VLC: The VideoLan Client isn’t pretty, but it will play just about any audio or video file you throw at it.
  • Pidgin: A single IM client that connects to just about every IM network: AOL, MSN, Yahoo!, MySpace, IRC, and so on. Available for Windows and Linux; Mac users can give Adium a try (I can’t vouch for it, since I haven’t used a Mac for 7 years…).

l


Research terms

February 26, 2008

There are such main research terms used as an attribute , eg. Web research tool.

Other:

  • Web research
  • Online research
  • Internet research
  • e-research
  • Web clipping

e-Learning Reloaded: Top 50 Web 2.0 Tools for Info Junkies, Researchers & Students

February 20, 2008

http://draltang01.blogspot.com/2008/02/elearning-reloaded.html
Published on Monday 18th of February, 2008
By Jessica Hupp

There’s a reason why the Web is called the information superhighway-it’s full of seemingly limitless resources for learning and research. And with the advent of Web 2.0, harnessing this information has never been easier. These are some of the best tools for organizing, citing, searching, and more online.

Organization
With all of the information available online, it’s hard to keep track, but these tools will help you stay together.
1. RSS: For ongoing publications, you can subscribe to syndicated feeds and get updates every time there’s new information.
2. Backpack: Backpack does what it sounds like it does-it keeps all of your stuff like notes, lists, ideas, calendar, and more all in one handy place.
3. Remember the Milk: Create a checklist for your project, stay on top of assignments, and more with this handy to-do app.
4. Google Docs and Spreadsheets: Keep all of your documents online, and even collaborate with peers using this tool from Google.
5. Google Notebook: Add clips, organize your notes, and even access your notes from your mobile phone with Google Notebook.
6. openonmy: Store files up to 1GB so that you can research and save information from anywhere with an Internet connection.
7. ThinkFold: Create outlines that can be shared and collaborated in realtime using ThinkFold.
8. Bubbl.us: Use this mind mapping tool to get your thoughts in order.
9. Flowchart: Create charts to organize your thoughts or notes with this neat tool.
10. Connotea: Designed for researchers, clinicians and scientists, this reference management tool is great for organizing and sharing references.
11. Google Calendar: Stay on top of assignment deadlines and more with this calendar. You can even add publicly-available calendars, like school schedules and more.
12. Zotero: Use this handy extension to collect, manage, and cite your research sources right from your browser.
13. Netvibes: Use Netvibes as your go-to page for collecting RSS feeds, and for jumping off points for research.
14. Notecentric: Using Notecentric, you can not only organize your notes online, but also share them with your classmates.

Bookmarks & Citation
Stay on top of references and generate bibliographies using these neat tools.
15. Yahoo! Bookmarks: Yahoo’s bookmark tool makes it easy to organize with folders, utilize the drag and drop functionality, and more.
16. Diigo: Diigo makes it easy to highlight, clip, and sticky-note right on a web page.
17. Notefish: Put all of your web research in one simple page with Notefish.
18. Qipit: Take a photo of notes and documents, and this service will turn it into a readable, taggable document.
19. BibMe: Enter books, websites, journals, and other sources into this tool, and it will automatically create a bibliography for you. They’ll even let you choose between different formats.
20. Clipmarks: Clip out important pieces of the web using this neat app.
21. Del.icio.us: Use del.icio.us to organize your bookmarks online, and access them easily with tags.
22. Google Bookmarks: With Google Bookmarks, you can keep track of sites and add your own searchable notes to them.
23. Wizlite: Highlight the Internet like it’s paper, then share it with your classmates or colleagues.
24. MyStickies: This awesome sticky note app allows you to put post-its on your desktop, or perhaps most importantly for researchers, on specific web pages.

Communication
Get connected with experts, classmates, and colleagues using these tools.
25. ConceptShare: If you’re working on a group project, this tool is great for collaboration. Because it’s web based, this tool is particularly ideal for long-distance group members.
26. LinkedIn: This professional networking tool is great for research. You can find experts in specific industries and even ask questions for the community to answer.
27. SpeakLike: Forget about language barriers, and use this chat application that will translate between two languages simultaneously.
28. Campusbug: This cool community has loads of useful tools, like flashcards, a bibliography generator, rapid learning, and a question bank.
29. NoteMesh: Using NoteMesh, you can share your notes with classmates whether they’re right next to you in class or on the other side of the world.

Money and Numbers
Whether you’re figuring out student loans or deciding how much to charge for your research, these tools can help out.
30. Instacalc: This calculator will do just about anything you want it to, and you can save links for later reference.
31. Prosper: Find the money you need to pay for school on this peer-to-peer loan site.
32. Calcoolate: With this cool calculator, you can do calculations, save your calculating history, and even replace your Windows calculator with the app.
33. Wesabe: This dashboard has it all, with advice, accounting tools, and more.

Search Tools
Use these tools to find the information you’re looking for.
34. trueknowledge: Get answers to your questions from this search engine built on knowledge.
35. CiteULike: Find academic papers on this site using their easy search and tags.
36. ChaCha: Use this human-powered search engine to find what you need. You can even use a live guided search with a real person who will ask you questions to find exactly what you want.
37. PennTags: Search through this user-created catalog to find articles and other references.
38. Footnote: Use this tool, and you’ll get access to millions of original documents from archives to shoeboxes.
39. SiteTradr: Find sites that are ranked socially by the education community on SiteTradr.
40. Wikipedia: Wikipedia is a great repository of information, both as an end point or a place to get started.

Learning
Learn how to do just about anything with these collaborative sites.
41. Instructables: Find out how to do just about anything, with pictures, on this instruction site.
42. BookRags: Find guides, lesson plans and more on BookRags.
43. College-Cram: College-Cram offers “social learning,” with resources, study groups, and more.
44. eHow: In this community, you’ll learn how to do everything from sneaking your child into a gifted program to creating a scavenger hunt.
45. Edublogs: See what instructors are saying and check out blogged classes on Edublogs.
46. TutorLinker: Get one-on-one guidance with a tutor from this site.
47. AnswerU: Ask a question, or look up old ones on this student-governed Q&A site.
48. MIT OpenCourseWare: Some colleges offer free courses, but MIT is the Queen Mother of them all with 1,800 courses to choose from.
49. SuTree: Get community knowledge with video lessons from all over the web.
50. wikiHow: In this collaborative writing project, you can get and share knowledge on more than 30,000 articles.

HT: Jessica for this excellent collection of links.